Nanowrimo Nutcase

nano_09_blk_participant_100x100_1.pngDan and I had a nice long chat about whether or not I’m off my rocker, and we came to the conclusion that while I might be slightly disturbed, I’m not completely ready for the psych ward.  I’m going to do the National Novel Writing Month contest, which means I’m going to be writing a 50,000 word (aprox. 175 page) novel this month.

Here’s the deal.  I never finish any large writing products. I’ve written several books with only a chapter or two completed (mostly nonfiction).  And I typically leave my short stories about 1/2 finished.  This blog and a few journal and newspaper articles seem to be the only things I can get finished.

It seems like deadlines help.  But also, the longest thing I’ve written is my 70 page Master’s thesis.  I’d like to tackle a bigger project and actually finish it.

I have a lot of ideas for topics, so I’m going to be running them by my husband later to see which one will work best for this kind of writing.

You can see my official NaNoWriMo site here.  And ideally, I’ll try to update my wordcount every few days.

Here’s to trying something new and challenging.  Remember that post I did about risks awhile ago? I think this classifies as one.

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Published in: on October 31, 2009 at 3:07 pm  Comments (8)  
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  1. Good for you! I am SO with you about not finishing anything. Maybe we should have another writer’s club just for the non-finishing writers. I have toyed with the idea, but couldn’t come up with the committment. Happy writing!

    AL: HAHA! Good one!

  2. I just left a comment on this blog post: NaBloPoMo Day 1 (tried to leave the link here, but dont think it took).

    Anyway. Holy Cow! It’s National Blog Posting Month, too! You’re supposed to blog once a day for the month of November.

    You gonna do both? Novel and daily blog?

    Me, too. NOT!

    AL: HAHA! I can’t imagine doing both. I’d have to quit my job and my family. =) But thanks for letting me know! Maybe next year I’ll tackle the blog challenge.

  3. Oh Amy, you are in for a wild ride! I did this in 2007 and I don’t think I’ve ever worked so hard. But it was the most exhilarating and extremely creative month I’ve ever spent. At 50,000 words my story (fantasy fiction which I made up off the top of my head as I went along) is about half finished I think. I’m not ready to take it up again yet…someday though. All the best to you! I look forward to hearing more about it as you progress through the month.

    AL: So I’m not the only crazy one? I should pick your brain about the experience, maybe get some tips. Hope to see you tomorrow at the NCWA meeting!

  4. Hurray!! I will be cheering for you and praying for you. I think this will be a great experience for you and am looking forward to hearing about your progress along the way. The starting always seems to be the fun part. It is that boggy middle that is the hardest. Happy writing!!

    AL: Thanks so much Amanda! That means a lot!

  5. Hi Amy…It’s about time you did Nano!

    I’ve done it twice. I hit my mark the first year,(got the tee shirt too!) and almost made it the second year (the second half of the story) and know what the third part will be…someday.

    The experience taught me so much about story construction and plot device. The “coaches” were amazing, and it was so helpful to learn that even best selling authors have the same sticking points, the same “this is garbage” moment, and the same serendipity moments too. And that best selling novels started as a Nano project.

    Writing with NO editing allowed is so freeing. Just let the story fly as it will. I’m a believer in the fact that the ONLY thing that can’t be edited is a blank page. Fill up the page fercryingoutloud…it is the ideas that count, editing can be done by someone else later.

    I egged Sara into Nano…and she wrote as I wrote part II, and we swapped manuscripts later. Her story is awesome! And she kindly edited my work for me.

    (I wrote about a Hannakah/Christmas event that went through Yale in modern times,and to the Hannakiah that burned while George Washington planned his Delaware Crossing. Mine was one of only about 200 novel written world wide in the religious genre that first year.
    Maybe one day you would be willing to look it over and give me some critique???)

    AL: I love how all these people are coming out of the woodwork to let me know they’ve done this before! It’s great to have some resources like you guys and gals! Your novel sounds very interesting…far more complex than mine is ever going to be. Maybe sometime after I settle down after this mess I can read it. =)

  6. I saw you Nano site. Your keyboard ain’t blazin’ and smokin’ yet. Hit it girl! You can do this!!!

    AL: Oh dear, you’re not going to let me stop on this, are you? Thanks!

  7. Re:

    Tweet on naming character: one of my characters changed names mid story. Be prepared to find out your characters are destined to surprise you over and over again, just like real people.

    AL: “Search: character name” “replace: new character name” “apply to all.” hehe. Been there, done that. =)

  8. Just do it!


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